Magnitude 7.3 Earthquake Hits Iran-Iraq Border; 450 Feared Dead 4,500 Injured

Irag Iran Earthquake

An earthquake hit the Iran-Iraq border last Sunday, which left more than 450 people dead.

According to The New York Times, the earthquake, which has the intensity of 7.3, hit the border at around 9:00 PM, where it’s epicenter was located near Ezgeleh, Iran. However, the quake was so strong that it was felt in other countries as well, such as Turkey and Pakistan.

Middle East earthquakeImage Credit: Shia News World via Twitter

Sources added that Iran’s seismologists noted that it was the biggest earthquake to have hit the western part of the country so far.

An Iraqi Kurd, who was one of those affected by the earthquake, witnessed the two-storey house next door to him destroyed. He added that “there were eight people inside.”

According to statistics from news source AFP, most of the casualties were from Iran, as it claimed 336 lives, as well as leaving 3,950 injured. On the other hand, Iraq suffered around 8 casualties, with about 535 injured. The number of casualties is partly attributed to the fact that most people were at their homes when the earthquake happened.

One resident named Loqman Hussein said, “All at once the electricity went out and I felt a strong tremor.” “I immediately ran out of the house with my family,” he added.

The people of Iran sticked together in these trying times, when it was reported that hundreds of people waited in line just to donate blood. The blood drive was in response to the government’s call for donations.

Iran’s head leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, expressed his grief last Monday and consoled those who were affected by the calamity. The country’s head also urged rescue workers to keep looking for survivors.

His office reported, “The officials should hasten in these first hours with all their might and determination to help the injured, especially those trapped under the rubble.” The rescue missions ended later in the evening, according to Iran’s local news media.

Image source:  nytimes.com

Roemart Tamayo

Roemart Tamayo Roemart is a writer by default because he writes for a living, but he also writes in his pastime. View my other posts